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  • Use for search:
    • Normal search: Match the string given in the Search field
    • Wildcards: The string can contain the wildcard characters 
      • ? (single character) 
      • * (any group of characters)
    • Regular expression: The search string is interpreted as a MySQL regular expression, except some regular expressions, that are black-listed for technical reasons.
      • Please see the MySQL regular expression documentation for details on how to use regular expressions
      • The following list contains the regular expressions which are not supported by translate5, because they are black-listed:

        Code Block
        languagejs
        titleBlacklisted regular expressions
        linenumberstrue
                \\x[a-fA-F0-9]{2} /g,//Hexadecimal escape | \xFF where FF are 2 hexadecimal digits | Matches the character at the specified position in the code page  |  \xA9 matches © when using the Latin-1 code page
                \n //Character escape
                \r //Character escape
                \t //Character escape
                \f //Character escape
                \v //Character escape
                \\c[a-zA-Z] /g,//Control character escape \cA through \cZ Match an ASCII character Control+A through Control+Z, equivalent to \x01 through \x1A   \cM\cJ matches a Windows CRLF line break
                //Control character escape \ca through \cz Match an ASCII character Control+A through Control+Z, equivalent to \x01 through \x1A   \cm\cj matches a Windows CRLF line break
                \\0 /g,//NULL escape
                \\(?:[1-7][0-7]{0,2}|[0-7]{2,3}) /g,//Octal escape
                (.*)\|(.*) /g,//javascript: a|ab matches a in ab | In POSIX ERE: a|ab matches ab in ab
                \\[\^\]\-] /g,//\ (backslash) followed by any of ^-]\
                \b //javascript: [\b\t] matches a backspace or a tab character.
                \B //javascript: \B. matches b, c, e, and f in abc def
                \d //Shorthand Character Classes
                \D //Shorthand Character Classes
                \s //Shorthand Character Classes
                \S //Shorthand Character Classes
                \w //Shorthand Character Classes
                \W //Shorthand Character Classes
                \h //Shorthand Character Classes
                \?\? /g,//abc?? matches ab or abc
                \*\? /g,//".*?" matches "def" and "ghi" in abc "def" "ghi" jkl
                \+\? /g,//".+?" matches "def" and "ghi" in abc "def" "ghi" jkl
                /{[0-9],[0-9]}\? /g,/
                /{[0-9],}\? /g,/
                e. g. \u78af //Specific Unicode code points can not be searched with regular expressions. The code point shown here is an example.
                /\(\?\:.*?\) /g,//Non-capturing parentheses group the regex so you can apply regex operators, but do not capture anything.
                /\(.*?\)=\\[0-9] /g,//(abc|def)=\1 matches abc=abc or def=def, but not abc=def or def=abc.
                /\(\?\=.*?\) /g,//Matches at a position where the pattern inside the lookahead can be matched. Matches only the position. It does not consume any characters or expand the match. In a pattern like one(?=two)three, both two and three have to match at the position where the match of one ends.
                /\(\?\!.*?\) /g,//Similar to positive lookahead, except that negative lookahead only succeeds if the regex inside the lookahead fails to match.
                /\[\:(.*)\:\]/g,
        The
         


        RefexDescription
        \x[a-fA-F0-9]{2}Hexadecimal escape | \xFF where FF are 2 hexadecimal digits | Matches the character at the specified position in the code page | \xA9 matches © when using the Latin-1 code page
        \nCharacter escape
        \rCharacter escape
        \tCharacter escape
        \fCharacter escape
        \vCharacter escape
        c[a-zA-Z]Control character escape \cA through \cZ Match an ASCII character Control+A through Control+Z, equivalent to \x01 through \x1A \cM\cJ matches a Windows CRLF line break. Control character escape \ca through \cz Match an ASCII character Control+A through Control+Z, equivalent to \x01 through \x1A \cm\cj matches a Windows CRLF line break
        \0NULL escape
        \(?:[1-7][0-7]{0,2}|[0-7]{2,3})Octal escape (Any character with a character code lower than 256 ex: \251)
        (.*)\|(.*)javascript: a|ab matches a in ab | In POSIX ERE: a|ab matches ab in ab
        \\[\^\]\-]\ (backslash) followed by any of ^-]\
        \bjavascript: [\b\t] matches a backspace or a tab character.
        \Bjavascript: \B. matches b, c, e, and f in abc def
        \dShorthand Character Classes
        \DShorthand Character Classes
        \sShorthand Character Classes
        \SShorthand Character Classes
        \wShorthand Character Classes
        \WShorthand Character Classes
        \hShorthand Character Classes
        \?\?abc?? matches ab or abc
        \*\?".*?" matches "def" and "ghi" in abc "def" "ghi" jkl
        \+\?".+?" matches "def" and "ghi" in abc "def" "ghi" jkl
        {[0-9],[0-9]}\?
        {[0-9],}\?
        \u[a-fA-F0-9]{4}Specific Unicode code points can not be searched with regular expressions. The code point shown here is an example. ex: \u78af
        \(\?\:.*?\)Non-capturing parentheses group the regex so you can apply regex operators, but do not capture anything.
        \(.*?\)=\\[0-9](abc|def)=\1 matches abc=abc or def=def, but not abc=def or def=abc.
        \(\?\=.*?\)Matches at a position where the pattern inside the lookahead can be matched. Matches only the position. It does not consume any characters or expand the match. In a pattern like one(?=two)three, both two and three have to match at the position where the match of one ends.
        \(\?\!.*?\)Similar to positive lookahead, except that negative lookahead only succeeds if the regex inside the lookahead fails to match.
        \[\:(.*)\:\]


      • The following table illustrates some commonly used metacharacters and constructs in a regular expression.

        MetacharacterBehavior
        ^matches the position at the beginning of the searched string
        $matches the position at the end of the searched string
        […]matches any character specified inside the square brackets
        [^…]matches any character not specified inside the square brackets
        *matches the preceding character zero or more times
        +matches preceding character one or more times
        {n}matches n number of instances of the preceding character
        {m,n}matches from m to n number of instances of the preceding character

         

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